Three Answers

The answers to “What do Winnie the Pooh and John the Baptist have in common?”

  1. They both ate honey.
  2. They both wore fur coats.
  3. They have the same middle name.

That’s from my notes from an adult camp meeting quite a few years ago, included in a letter to family which turned up in a box of papers a few days ago.

I found my very old copy of Winnie the Pooh. When I was little, I enjoyed the stories–How do Christopher Robin and his friends resolve this dilemma?  Now I appreciate the humor.  Once again, it’s good bedtime reading.

 

 

Winnie the Pooh and John the Baptist

What Three Things do Winnie the Pooh and John the Baptist have in common?

If you can’t guess, maybe these quotations will help:

Winnie The Pooh

Once upon a time, a very long time ago now, about last Friday, Winnie-the-Pooh lived in a forest all by himself under the name of Sanders.

(IWhat does “under the name” mean?” asked Christopher Robin.
“It means he had the name over the door in gold letters and he lived under it.”
Winnie-the-Pooh wasn’t quite sure,” said Christopher Robin.
“Now I am,” said a growly voice.
“Then I will go on,” said I.)

One day when he was out walking, he came to an open place in the middle of the forest, and in the middle of this place was a large oak-tree, and from the top of the tree there came a loud buzzing noise.

Winnie-the-Pooh sat down at the foot of the tree, put his head between his paws, and began to think.

First of all, he said to himself: “That buzzing noise means something.  You don’t get a buzzing noise like that, just buzzing and buzzing, without its meaning something.  If there’s a buzzing noise, somebody’s making a buzzing noise, and the only reason for making a buzzing noise that I know of is because you’re a bee…And the only reason for being a bee that I know of is making honey.”

John the Baptist  Matthew 3, Modern English Version

In those days John the Baptist came, preaching in the wilderness of Judea, and saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” For this is he who was spoken of by the prophet Isaiah, saying:

“The voice of one crying in the wilderness:
‘Prepare the way of the Lord;
make His paths straight.’ ”

This same John had clothing made of camel’s hair, a leather belt around his waist, and his food was locusts and wild honey.  Then Jerusalem, and all Judea, and all the region around the Jordan went out to him and were baptized by him in the Jordan, confessing their sins.

But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said to them, “O generation of vipers, who has warned you to escape from the wrath to come? Therefore, bear fruit worthy of repentance, and do not think to say within yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our father,’ for I say to you that God is able from these stones to raise up children for Abraham. Even now the ax is put to the tree roots. Therefore, every tree which does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.”

Answers to be posted tomorrow.

In case you’re wondering: One answer was obvious to me, I should have guessed the second, and the third—I had no idea!

Trapp Family Singers–and a Fly!

When the Trapp Family Singers (Sound of Music) began their U.S. singing tour, they expected audiences who would be impressed by their technical skill and the difficulty of their selections.  Their audiences agreed that they were exceptionally good singers, but that didn’t mean they wanted to listen to a 45-minute-long piece that they knew nothing about!

Their manager said, “There is something you are lacking…something between you and your audience.”

Then came the fly.

The Trapps were finishing a concert of madrigals and motets, Bach and Mozart.  Maria chose a “Jodler”  for the encore.

“In yodeling, one has to take a deep breath and then hold out for long phrases at a time.  We were just in the middle of it when, oh horror!  A fly started circling around my face.  I watched it, cross-eyed, and got panicky,  I knew very soon I would have to take a deep breath, and what if…

“We took our deep breath and it happened.  In went the fly…a good cough would have helped, but to cough the right way on stage is much, much harder than to sing the right way.  I outdid myself in not coughing, but I couldn’t help turning purple.  I happened to have the leading part in this jodler, the melody; but that mountain call had to be finished without it…My brave children tried not to pay any attention to their choking mother, and when they were finished, I was too—with the fly.“

Maria felt she had to apologize.  She announced, “What never happened before has happened now.  I swallowed a fly.”

The audience laughed..and laughed…and laughed.  When they quieted down, she wanted to make up for the spoiled encore with an Austrian folk song.  She explained:  “It describes how a young hunter climbs up in the rocks for hours looking for, and finally shooting, a—”   The animal she meant was a chamois, but instead she said “chemise.*”  Not only the audience, but the rest of the family, shook with laughter.

The missing link had been found–interact with your listeners as if you are at home enjoying a musical party.

  • A chamois is a kind of deer; its hide is the chamois that polishes a car.  A chemise, for those who aren’t familiar with fashion terminology from half a century ago, is a loose-fitting garment that can be a nightgown, underwear, or a simple dress.

 

Who is Roy Wen?

My Other Half is a dedicated Word-Find fan.  Those are the puzzles that look like scrambled alphabet in columns, and you are supposed to search out words up and down, back and forth, and diagonally.  I fail completely when it comes to finding an actual word by reading diagonally from upper right to lower left, so I don’t even try.  I think something about his dyslexia (don’t ask him to spell anything!) somehow helps with word search.

A few minutes ago he was working on a history-themed word search and detected the name “Roy Wen” in this string:  “EYTICKROYWENILR.”     Curious, he did an internet search and found plenty named”Roy Wenzel” which didn’t help a bit because of the ILR instead of ZEL.  Then there’s the word TICK.

He figured it out.  You can, too:  Take the E off the beginning and the IRL off the end, and read backwards, or, if you are like me, re-write the remaining letters in reverse order.  You got it!

How many legs…?

A college graduate tells me that what she remembers from a math class for non-majors (that is, math for students whose talents lie elsewhere) is a question her professor asked at the end of a quiz:

 

 

“How many legs does a cow have?”

 

 

 

Answer:  Six.  Two hind legs and forelegs in front.

By the way, they weren’t graded down for incorrect answers on that one.